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Regular Admissions Trends for the Class of 2022

It was another exciting year in regular decision college admissions! As a follow-up to our previous blog on Early Admissions Trends for the Class of 2022, here’s an in-depth review of this year’s regular decision trends. To assist applicants who will be applying this fall, our analysis will conclude with a helpful list of tips for crafting your “best-fit” college list.

Rising Applicant Numbers, Lower Acceptance Rates

This year, regular decision acceptance rates continued to drop slightly for many schools. As in past years, highly sought-after private and public universities continue to receive more and more applications, offer lower admit rates, and fill more of their freshman class through early admissions.

Many schools had a record-breaking year of applications. Bowdoin broke school records and received 25% more applications than last year, which may be attributed to an increase in international applications and the elimination of the application fee for students who are applying for financial aid (a policy which only began last year). Bates also broke records with a 45% increase in applications, and Carnegie Mellon saw a 19% rise. Boston University continues to offer below-average tuition increases compared to other national four-year independent schools, which could be a driving factor in BU’s rising applications. Georgetown’s Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Charles Deacon attributes the higher number of applications to their location of Washington, DC and increased political engagement among America’s youth since the 2016 elections.

Several factors contribute to rising applicant numbers, and thus lower acceptance rates. The highly-selective process of applying to elite schools can cause stressed-out high school students to apply to even more schools year over year. The Common Application and other online admissions processes, which most schools have adopted, make it easier than ever to apply to even more schools. The Common App broke its own records when students submitted more than 1 million applications by November 1, 2017. This is a 20% increase from the early application cycle in 2016. Additionally, schools have made it a priority to increase their marketing and use innovative ways to reach prospective applicants, especially through social media.

The nationwide rise in SAT scores, due to inflated scores from the re-designed SAT, may have convinced students to consider more elite schools as within reach. For example, a 1500 on the new SAT is equivalent to a 1460 on the old SAT, a new SAT 1400 is equal to an old SAT 1340, and a new SAT 1300 corresponds to an old SAT 1230. As a result, students might not be looking closely enough at College Board concordance tables to reasonably assess their chances of admission based on previous year’s test scores. There also remains uncertainty about how colleges view the new SAT scores, since the new test has only impacted students in the classes of 2017 and 2018 so far.

Early vs. Regular Acceptance Rates for a Sampling of Selective Colleges
College Regular
Class of 2022*
Early
Class of 2022
Regular
Class of 2021*
Early
Class of 2021
Regular
Class of 2020*
Early
Class of 2020
Regular
Class of 2019*
Early
Class of 2019
Amherst College (ED) n/a n/a n/a n/a 12.2% 39.6% 12.4% 35.6%
Bowdoin College
(ED I)
n/a n/a n/a 25% 11.6% 33.7% n/a 31%
Brown University (ED) 5.5% 21.1% 6.8% 21.9% 7.6% 22% 7.2% 20.3%
Claremont McKenna College (ED) n/a n/a 8% 31% 7% n/a 9% 27%
Columbia University (ED) Only releases overall acceptance rates, not early and regular admissions rate data; see chart below.
Cornell University (ED) 8.3% 24.3% 10.8% 25.6% 12.5% 27.4% 13.7% 26.2%
Dartmouth College (ED) 6.9% 24.9% 8.5% 27.8% 8.9% 26% 8.8% 26%
Duke University (ED) 6.4% 21.4% 7.3% 24.5% 8.7% 23.5% 9.4% 26%
Georgetown University (REA) n/a n/a 17.4% 11.9% n/a 13% n/a 13%
Harvard University (SCEA) 2.43% 14.5% 3.4% 14.7% 3.4% 14.8% 3.2% 16.5%
Johns Hopkins University (ED) 8.4% 29.9% 10.3% 30.5% 10.1% 30.3% 11% 28.9%
MIT (EA) 6.6% 6.9% 6.6% 7.8% 7.4% 8.4% 7.1% 9.6%
Middlebury College  (ED I) 15.1% 50.1% 16.7% 51% 12.7% 53.1% 14.7% 45.3%
Northwestern University (ED) 6.4% 26% 7.2% 28% 8.4% 35% 10.8% 36.2%
Pomona College (ED) n/a n/a 6.8% 21% n/a 19.4% n/a 19%
Princeton University (SCEA) 3.8% 14.7% 4.3% 15.4% 4.4% 18.5% 4.9% 19.9%
Rice University (ED) n/a n/a 15% 21% 15% 23% 15.6% 20.4%
Stanford University (SCEA) n/a** n/a** n/a** n/a** 3.6% 9.5% 3.9% 10.2%
University of Notre Dame (REA) 14.2% 24.8% 15.7% 24.4% 13.8% 30.3% 16.2% 29.8%
University of Chicago (EA) Only releases overall acceptance rates, not early and regular admissions rate data; see chart below.
University of Pennsylvania (ED) 6.5% 18.5% 6.8% 22% 7% 23.2% 7.5% 24%
University of Virginia (EA) 24.6% 27.8% 24.6% 29% 28.8% 28.9% 26.6% 30.2%
Vanderbilt University (ED) 7.3% 20.5% 8.6% 23.6% 8.8% 23.6% 9.5% 22.5%
Washington Univ. in St. Louis (ED) Only releases overall acceptance rate, not early and regular admissions rate data; see chart below.
Williams College (ED) n/a*** n/a*** 12.7% 35% 15% 42% 14.5% 41%
Yale University (SCEA) 4.7% 14.7% 5% 17.1% 4.4% 17% 4.7% 16%

*Regular admission acceptance rate calculations do not include early admission deferral numbers.
** In a break from tradition, for the past 2 years Stanford has not released early admissions statistics.
***This year, Williams did not release their early admissions and regular admissions statistics.

Overall Acceptance Rates for the Classes of 2018 through 2021
College Class of 2022 Class of 2021 Class of 2020 Class of 2019 Class of 2018
Amherst College (ED) 12.8% 12.9% 13.7% 13.7% 13%
Bowdoin College (ED I) 10.3% 13.6% 14.3% 14.9% 14.9%
Brown University (ED) 7.2% 8.3% 9% 8.5% 8.6%
California Institute of Technology (EA) n/a 8% 7.9% 9% 9%
Claremont McKenna College (ED) n/a 10.4% 9.4% 11% 10%
Columbia University (ED) 5.5% 5.8% 6% 6.1% 6.94%
Cornell University (ED) 10.3% 12.5% 14% 14.9% 14%
Dartmouth College (ED) 8.7% 10.4% 10.5% 10.3% 11.5%
Duke University (ED) 8.3% 9% 10.4% 11% 11%
Georgetown University (REA) 14.5% 15.4% 16.4% 16.4% 16.6%
Harvard University (SCEA) 4.59% 5.2% 5.2% 5.3% 5.9%
Johns Hopkins University (ED) 9.9% 11.8% 11.5% 12.4% 15%
Lehigh University (ED) 22% 24.7% 26.3% 30% 34%
MIT (EA) 6.7% 7.1% 7.8% 8% 7.7%
Middlebury College (ED I) 18.4% 19.7% 16% 17% 17.3%
New York University (ED) 19% 27% 30% 30% 35%
Northwestern University (ED) 8.4% 9% 10.7% 13.1% 12.9%
Pomona College (ED) 6.9% 8.2% 9.1% 10.3% 12.2%
Princeton University (SCEA) 5.5% 6.1% 6.46% 6.99% 7.28%
Rice University (ED) n/a 16% 15% 16% 14.1%
Stanford University (SCEA) 4.29% 4.6% 4.7% 5.05% 5.07%
Swarthmore College (ED) 9% 10.2% 12.5% 12.2% 16.8%
UC – Berkeley (EA) n/a n/a 14.8% 17% 17%
University of Chicago (EA) 7.2% 8.7% 7.6% 7.8% 8.4%
University of Notre Dame (REA) 17.6% 18.4% 18.3% 19.7% 20.8%
University of Pennsylvania (ED) 8.4% 9.2% 9.4% 9.9% 9.9%
University of Virginia (EA) 26.5% 27% 29.9% 28.5% 28.9%
USC (No early program) 13% 16% 16.5% 17.5% 17.8%
Vanderbilt University (ED) n/a 10.3% 10.5% n/a 12%
Washington Univ. in St. Louis (ED) 15% 16% 16.2% 16.7% 17.1%
Williams College (ED) 12.2% 14.6% 17.3% 16.8% 18.2%
Yale University (SCEA) 6.3% 6.9% 6.3% 6.5% 6.3%

Larger Percentages of Freshman Classes Filled with Early Applicants

Some schools continue to admit large portions of the freshman class through early admissions, making the regular admissions cycle even more competitive. More students tend to apply through regular decision, so they are competing for fewer remaining positions in the class.

As a reminder, early decision is binding; universities are guaranteed applicants’ attendance, as compared with early action, which is non-binding and gives students until May 1st  to decide. As a result, colleges with early decision programs tend to admit a higher percentage of early applicants, who have demonstrated such strong interest, and their binding commitment helps increase admissions yield for the incoming class.

This year, schools including BowdoinDartmouth, DukeMiddlebury,  Northwestern, and the University of Pennsylvania admitted 40% to 50% or more of their incoming class through their early decision program.

Smaller Accepted Classes and the Wait List

As schools attempt to determine yield (the number of accepted students who will attend), many institutions admitted smaller classes this year compared to last year. For some, this is a reaction to a larger than expected yield in years prior, or part of a plan to admit more students from the wait list, once the initial admitted group has responded.

Dartmouth only admitted 1,925 students this year, compared to 2,092 students admitted last year. This is the smallest class admitted since the 1990s. Last year’s yield was 61%, Dartmouth’s highest in 25 years.

This year, Harvard admitted 4.6% fewer students than last year. The Class of 2021 had a record-high matriculation rate of 84%, and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons plans to potentially accept 40 to 50 or even 100 students off the wait list to avoid over-enrollment again. Cynics say that this is also a way to compete with Stanford’s exceptionally low admit rates, and increase the stats of the incoming class, which draw from the students initially admitted, not the wait list.

Demonstrated Interest Matters More

As schools receive more and more applications, the difficulty in predicting yield (number of admitted student who will attend) has increased. According to Dean of Undergraduate Admissions Charles Deacon at Georgetown, receiving more qualified applications requires admissions officers to place greater importance on the student’s interest in Georgetown when determining admissions decisions.

Demonstrated interest refers to the ways that a student shows how engaged they are in the school and committed to attending if admitted. Most often interest is assessed through college visits and contact with the college. Inside Higher Ed points out that this is particularly important for students with high SAT scores. Colleges do not want to be considered a “safety school,” and may avoid high-scoring applicants who demonstrate little interest beyond applying.

For tips on how to demonstrate interest to your top school choices, see our blog.

Expanding Enrollment

Some schools are planning to accommodate increased applications by expanding enrollment. LehighPrincetonStanfordUVAWashington University in St. Louis, and Yale all have strategic plans to increase incoming class size over several years.

For the second year in a row, Yale has admitted its largest incoming freshman class in school history (15% larger than previous recent classes), after the new residential colleges of Pauli Murray and Benjamin Franklin opened in the fall of 2017.

Lehigh implemented The Path to Prominence plan to expand and upgrade the campus, in order to accommodate an increase of the freshman class by 1,000 students over seven years. The new College of Health and construction of new dorms are part of this plan.

Stanford University plans to expand student enrollment “in recognition of the fact that applications to Stanford have increased while spaces available have not.” Accordingly, Stanford has filed for a permit to expand the physical campus to accommodate a growth of 100 more students per year, until the year 2035. In the fall of 2015, 6,994 undergraduates were enrolled at Stanford, and by 2035, this number is projected to increase to 8,785 undergraduates, which is a 25% growth over 20 years.

In April, Dartmouth released an enrollment expansion report, detailing the resources required to increase enrollment 10-25%. This was an exploratory report, and Dartmouth has no current plans to increase class size. The report cited schools that have expanded enrollment or plan to expand in the near future including Princeton University, Rice University and Yale University, while noting that Brandeis University, Brown University and Harvard University have decided not to expand their enrollments.

Increasing Diversity

Increasing the diversity of incoming classes has become a top priority for the admissions departments at many schools. This includes international applicants, students from varying socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds, and first-generation college students. Schools are seeking top-quality students from diverse backgrounds through a variety of programs, including QuestBridge, the KIPP Foundation, and A Better Chance.

Many schools are committed to increasing diversity and the makeup of their admitted applicant pool demonstrates this goal. Schools with high percentages of students of color in the admitted class include Amherst (56%), Brown (49%), Cornell (54%), Dartmouth (50%), Pomona (56.5%), and Princeton (53.4%).


Delaying Admission

More and more schools are offering delayed admission to incoming freshmen, providing spring acceptances or asking the students to begin the following fall.

Middlebury anticipates that about 100 students will matriculate in February 2019 as members of the Class of 2022. For the third year, Cornell admitted 60 students to the First-Year Spring Admission (FYSA) program, which was established in 2015 to increase access to a Cornell education. Hamilton aims to enroll about 40 first-year students in their spring admission program each year. This allows Hamilton to offer admission to additional strong applicants, while also filling spots created by current students who are studying abroad during the spring semester.

Princeton offers a different kind of option for students accepted for fall entry. The Bridge Year Program “allows incoming first-year students to spend a tuition-free year engaging in international service work abroad in Bolivia, China, India, Indonesia or Senegal.” This year, up to 35 incoming freshmen are expected to participate.

Tips for Future Applicants

Think carefully about your college list. When crafting your college list, reflect about your goals, interests, and values. Make sure that you would be happy to attend any school on your list. Do not apply to a university that is not a good fit, or about which you have reservations. Be very realistic about your chances and have grounded expectations. Your college list should have a healthy distribution of reach, target, and safe schools. Apply to 10-12 colleges so that you have enough time to prepare high-quality applications, and still manage the process alongside your academic responsibilities senior year.

Demonstrate interest. In a competitive admissions climate increasingly concerned with yield, demonstrating interest is more important than ever. Visit all of the schools in which you are interested. When you visit, register with the admissions reception desk. Many schools track visits, and see this as the strongest possible way to demonstrate interest.  If you are applying for early admission, visit the college by November 15. If you are applying for regular admission, visit in the fall of your senior year, or by February 15 at the latest.

Know your colleges. Many colleges go a step further, and emphasize “informed” interest.  It’s not enough to visit the college; you need to observe the features of each college that differentiate it from other schools, and that align with your own interests and goals.  Be prepared to inform colleges in your essays and interviews of specific reasons why you wish to attend.

Be strategic with early admissions. While early acceptance rates tend to be higher than regular acceptance rates, early admissions have become harder to predict. Think carefully and strategically about your early admissions choice.

Highlight your heritage. Many universities have made increasing the diversity of incoming classes a top admissions priority. If you identify with an under-represented minority, participate in diversity days hosted by the college, if appropriate.

Engage in school. In order to maximize your options in the college admissions process, try to reach your potential throughout high school. Engage in your academics: do your homework, participate in classes, choose interesting projects, speak with your teachers if you have questions, and manage your time well. Identify your interests, and choose extracurricular activities that are meaningful to you; participate with commitment and continuity; and seek leadership roles in the activities you enjoy the most.  Engaging in your coursework and activities in high school will also position you well for making the most of your college years.

The college admissions process can be overwhelming, and it may feel difficult to know where to start. At Collegiate Gateway, we are eager to share our expertise and guide you on the path to your “best fit” college. Please feel free to contact us! As always, we’re happy to help!

How to Demonstrate Interest to Colleges

In recent years, “demonstrated interest” has become an increasingly important part of the college admissions process.  Most valued by colleges that are private, smaller, and more selective, this “informed” interest allows you to reveal your knowledge of the college and make a stronger case as to why the school is a good fit for you.

Demonstrated interest helps colleges assess the likelihood that students will:

  • Attend if admitted
  • Be a good fit and engage in activities on campus
  • Be loyal to the school as an alum, and donate money or time

Citing the 2014 NACAC (National Association of College Admissions Counseling) State of College Admissions Report, Money notes that about 20% of colleges say they place considerable importance on the admissions factor of a student’s demonstrated interest, 34% of colleges claim it’s of moderate importance, and about 20% of colleges state it has no importance at all. About a decade ago, only 7% of colleges assigned heavy importance to demonstrated interest.

One reason for this change is that as the numbers of applicants increases, college admissions has been more selective, and demonstrated interest helps colleges narrow the field. In addition, the US News & World Report college rankings include “yield,” or the percentage of accepted students who choose to attend the college, as one factor, so increasing yield boosts colleges’ rankings.

Inside Higher Ed points out that students who have high SAT scores can be impacted by this admissions factor the most. Colleges do not want to be considered a “safety school,” and may avoid high-scoring applicants who demonstrate little interest beyond applying.

So how do you go about demonstrating informed interest in a school? Below, we’ve developed a 10-point plan, outlining the many different ways you can communicate the strength and depth of your genuine interest to your best-fit colleges.

Collegiate Gateway’s 10-point plan: 

VISIT the college and register in the admissions office. Many colleges track campus visits as a key measure of demonstrated interest. The University of Rochester tracks all student contacts with the school. Colleges may offer many different kinds of visit opportunities. For example, many colleges, such as CornellNorthwestern and University of Michigan, offer tours and information sessions for their specialized schools in fields such as business, engineering, or communications. Some colleges offer organized visit days for students; Lehigh offers a Junior Open House in the spring and Senior Open House in the fall. However, there are other colleges, like Stanford and Brown, that do not track visits or interest.

But keep in mind that regardless of whether the college tracks your visit, being on campus still has enormous value for you in helping you understand the features that are a good fit for you, and in determining whether you wish to apply to the school.

ATTEND info sessions at your high school or local college fairs. Even if you have visited the college campus, it is still worthwhile to attend local sessions where your regional admissions officer visits your high school or participates on a panel or college fair in your community.

APPLY EARLY! Applying Early Decision shows the most interest, as the binding decision is a clear demonstration of your commitment to the school. However, only apply ED if you are sure that the college is an excellent fit for you, and is within reach. Applying Early Action (non-binding) also shows interest because you are sufficiently motivated to prepare and submit your application early.

REGISTER on the undergraduate admissions website to receive information.

FOLLOW colleges on social media, including Twitter, blogs, and Facebook. Often, the information posted will be more informal, and will give you a more “inside” look at the school. And some colleges do track your engagement with their social media.

INTERVIEW on-campus or with an alumni in your area. Colleges are reducing the availability of on-campus interviews, due to the increased numbers of students applying and the lack of available staff. Alumni interviews are an excellent option; take advantage of all opportunities.

RESEARCH the college thoroughly when you write your supplemental essays. Many colleges have a “Match Essay” asking why you want to attend the college. Write as specifically as possible about the programs and culture of the college, and about the strengths and interests you would bring to campus.

THANK college officials after college visits and interviews. Email a thank-you note to the admissions officer who conducted your information session or interview, and include specifics regarding what you learned and the features of the college that most appealed to you. In addition, if you interview with an alum in your local area, send a thank-you note including specific discussion topics that were meaningful to you.

CONTACT the regional admissions officer after you apply by sending an occasional email if you have substantive news to report (e.g. honors, awards, completion of a major school project, a special accomplishment in an activity) or a genuine question that is not answered on the website.

CHECK your online portal for your application status, once you’ve applied, as some colleges interpret this as a sign of interest.

As more and more schools rely on demonstrated interest to help them achieve their enrollment goals, it is increasingly important to show your preference for schools in an authentic way. Here at Collegiate Gateway, we are always happy to answer your questions and discuss this topic further. Feel free to contact us!

Regular Admissions Trends for the Class of 2021

It was another exciting year in regular decision college admissions! As a follow-up to our previous blog on Early Admissions Trends for the Class of 2021, here’s an in-depth review of this year’s regular decision trends. To assist applicants who will be applying this fall, our analysis will conclude with a helpful list of tips for crafting your “best-fit” college list.

Rising Applicant Numbers, Lower Acceptance Rates

This year, regular decision acceptance rates tended to either hold steady or drop slightly. As in past years, highly sought-after private and public universities continue to receive more and more applications, offer lower admit rates, and fill more of their freshman class through early admissions.

Many schools had a record-breaking year of applications, including Brown, Georgetown, Northwestern, Princeton, UVA, and Washington University in St. Louis. WashU has seen a 4% increase in applicants since last year and a 28% rise since 2008.

Many of the country’s most selective institutions (with overall admit rates already under 15%) became even more competitive over the past three years. For example, Duke dropped from 11% to 9%, Northwestern fell from 12.9% to 9%, Swarthmore declined from 16.8% to 10.2%, and Williams decreased from 18.2% to 14.6%. Stanford has the lowest admit rate at just 4.6%.

This year, Brown, Cornell, Duke, Princeton, Stanford, and UPenn all reported record-low admit rates. Over the past ten years, Swarthmore has experienced a 59% increase in applications and only a 7% increase in acceptances, which has led to their declining acceptance rates. Michael Mills, Associate Provost for Northwestern University enrollment, said the highly-selective process of applying to elite colleges and universities can cause stressed-out high school students to send out more applications. Increased applications, in turn, make admissions even more selective, further feeding the cycle.

According to Richard Shaw, Dean of Admission and Financial Aid at Stanford University, these ultra-low admit rates are the product of several factors, including top students applying to many more schools, and higher demand across several demographics (including international applicants). Beyond the simple fact that high school graduation rates have been steadily increasing, U.S. News also attributes higher applicant numbers to the Common Application and other online admissions processes, which most schools have adopted. Universities also use innovative ways to market themselves to prospective applicants, especially through social media.

Early vs. Regular Acceptance Rates for the Class of 2019 through 2021

College Regular Acceptance Rate for Class of 2021* Early Acceptance Rate for Class of 2021 Regular Acceptance Rate for Class of 2020* Early Acceptance Rate for Class of 2020 Regular Acceptance Rate for Class of 2019* Early Acceptance Rate for Class of 2019
Amherst College (ED) n/a n/a 12.2% 39.6% 12.4% 35.6%
Bowdoin College (ED I) n/a 25% 11.6% 33.7% n/a 31%
Brown University (ED) 6.8% 21.9% 7.6% 22% 7.2% 20.3%
Claremont McKenna College (ED) 8% 31% 7% n/a 9% 27%
Columbia University (ED) Only releases overall acceptance rates, not early and regular admissions rate data.
Cornell University (ED) 10.8% 25.6% 12.5% 27.4% 13.7% 26.2%
Dartmouth College (ED) 8.5% 27.8% 8.9% 26% 8.8% 26%
Duke University (ED) 7.3% 24.5% 8.7% 23.5% 9.4% 26%
Georgetown University (REA) 17.4% 11.9% n/a 13% n/a 13%
Harvard University (SCEA) 3.4% 14.7% 3.4% 14.8% 3.2% 16.5%
Johns Hopkins University (ED) 10.3% 30.5% 10.1% 30.3% 11% 28.9%
MIT (EA) 6.6% 7.8% 7.4% 8.4% 7.1% 9.6%
Middlebury College (ED I) 16.7% 51% 12.7% 53.1% 14.7% 45.3%
Northwestern University (ED) 7.2% 26% 8.4% 35% 10.8% 36.2%
Pomona College (ED) 6.8% 21% n/a 19.4% n/a 19%
Princeton University (SCEA) 4.3% 15.4% 4.4% 18.5% 4.9% 19.9%
Rice University (ED) n/a 21% 15% 23% 15.6% 20.4%
Stanford University (SCEA) n/a** n/a** 3.6% 9.5% 3.9% 10.2%
University of Notre Dame (REA) 15.7% 24.4% 13.8% 30.3% 16.2% 29.8%
University of Chicago (EA) Only releases overall acceptance rates, not early and regular admissions rate data.
University of Pennsylvania (ED) 6.8% 22% 7% 23.2% 7.5% 24%
University of Virginia (EA) 24.6% 29% 28.8% 28.9% 26.6% 30.2%
Vanderbilt University (ED) 8.6% 23.6% 8.8% 23.6% 9.5% 22.5%
Washington Univ. in St. Louis (ED) Only releases overall acceptance rate, not give early and regular admissions rate data.
Williams College (ED) 12.7% 35% 15% 42% 14.5% 41%
Yale University (SCEA) 5% 17.1% 4.4% 17% 4.7% 16%

*Regular admission acceptance rate calculations do not include early admission deferral numbers.

** In a break from tradition, Stanford did not release early admissions statistics.

Overall Acceptance Rates for the Class of 2018 through 2021

College  Overall Acceptance Rate for Class of 2021 Overall Acceptance Rate for Class of 2020 Overall Acceptance Rate for Class of 2019 Overall Acceptance Rate for Class of 2018
Amherst College (ED) n/a 13.7% 13.7% 13%
Bowdoin College (ED I) 13.4% 14.3% 14.9% 14.9%
Brown University (ED) 8.3% 9% 8.5% 8.6%
California Institute of Technology (EA) n/a 7.9% 9% 9%
Claremont McKenna College (ED) 10.4% 9.4% 11% 10%
Columbia University (ED) 5.8% 6% 6.1% 6.94%
Cornell University (ED) 12.5% 14% 14.9% 14%
Dartmouth College (ED) 10.4% 10.5% 10.3% 11.5%
Duke University (ED) 9% 10.4% 11% 11%
Georgetown University (REA) 15.4% 16.4% 16.4% 16.6%
Harvard University (SCEA) 5.2% 5.2% 5.3% 5.9%
Johns Hopkins University (ED) 11.8% 11.5% 12.4% 15%
Lehigh University (ED) 24.7% 26.3% 30% 34%
MIT (EA) 7.1% 7.8% 8% 7.7%
Middlebury College (ED I) 19.7% 16% 17% 17.3%
Northwestern University (ED) 9% 10.7% 13.1% 12.9%
Pomona College (ED) 8.2% 9.1% 10.3% 12.2%
Princeton University (SCEA) 6.1% 6.46% 6.99% 7.28%
Rice University (ED) n/a 15% 16% 14.1%
Stanford University (SCEA) 4.6% 4.7% 5.05% 5.07%
Swarthmore College (ED) 10.2% 12.5% 12.2% 16.8%
UC – Berkeley (EA) n/a 14.8% 17% 17%
University of Chicago (EA) n/a** 7.6% 7.8% 8.4%
University of Notre Dame (REA) 18.4% 18.3% 19.7% 20.8%
University of Pennsylvania (ED) 9.15% 9.4% 9.9% 9.9%
University of Virginia (EA) 27% 29.9% 28.5% 28.9%
USC (No early program) 16% 16.5% 17.5% 17.8%
Vanderbilt University (ED) 10.3% 10.5% n/a 12%
Washington Univ. in St. Louis (ED) 16% 16.2% 16.7% 17.1%
Williams College (ED) 14.6% 17.3% 16.8% 18.2%
Yale University (SCEA) 6.9% 6.3% 6.5% 6.3%

**In a break from tradition, the University of Chicago did not release this year’s applicant numbers or acceptance rates.

Larger Percentages of Freshman Classes Filled with Early Applicants

Some schools continue to admit large portions of the freshman class through early admissions, making the regular admissions cycle even more competitive. More students tend to apply through regular decision, so they are competing for fewer remaining positions in the class.

As a reminder, early decision is binding; universities are guaranteed the applicants’ attendance, as compared with early action, which is non-binding and allows students until May 1 to decide. As a result, colleges with early decision programs tend to admit a higher percentage of early applicants, who have demonstrated such strong interest, and their binding commitment helps increase admissions yield for the incoming class.

This year, schools that admitted 40% to 50% of their incoming class through their early decision program include Dartmouth, WilliamsDukeUniversity of PennsylvaniaNorthwestern, and Middlebury College.

Expanding Enrollment

Some schools are planning to accommodate increased applications by expanding enrollment. Lehigh, PrincetonStanfordUVAWashington University in St. Louis, and Yale all have strategic plans to increase incoming class size over several years.

Yale has admitted its largest incoming freshman class in school history (15% larger than recent classes), as the new residential colleges of Pauli Murray and Benjamin Franklin are scheduled to open in the fall of 2017. Dean of Yale College, Jonathan Holloway, said one of the administration’s top priorities is preparing for the larger student body. Over the next four years, Yale plans to increase undergraduate enrollment from 5,400 to 6,200 students. “This expansion touches on every aspect of learning, including teaching, facilities, and financial aid.”

Lehigh implemented The Path to Prominence plan to expand and upgrade the campus, in order to accommodate an increase of the freshman class by 1,000 students over the next seven years. The new College of Health and construction of new dorms are part of this plan.

Stanford University has applied for county permits to accommodate campus expansion for class size growth of 100 more students per year, until the year 2035. In the fall of 2015, 6,994 undergraduates were enrolled at Stanford, and by 2035, this number is projected to increase to 8,785 undergraduates, which is 25% growth over 20 years.

Increasing Diversity

Increasing the diversity of incoming classes has become a top priority for the admissions departments at many schools. This includes international applicants, students from varying socioeconomic and ethnic backgrounds, and first-generation college students. Schools are seeking top-quality students from diverse backgrounds through a variety of programs, including QuestBridge, the KIPP Foundation, and A Better Chance.

Many schools are committed to increasing diversity and the makeup of their admitted applicant pool demonstrates this goal. Schools with high percentages of students of color in the admitted class include Brown (47%), Cornell (52.5%), Dartmouth (51%), Princeton (53.4%), and Williams (50%).

Some schools have also made international diversity a priority as well. This year, Dartmouth accepted 38% more students from foreign countries, the largest international cohort in the school’s history. About half of the accepted international students will be offered need-based financial aid.

Delaying Admission

More and more schools are offering delayed admission to incoming freshmen, offering spring acceptances or asking the students to begin the following fall.

Middlebury anticipates that about 100 students will matriculate in February 2018 as members of the Class of 2021. This year, Cornell admitted 60 students to the First-Year Spring Admission (FYSA) program, which was established in 2015 to increase access to a Cornell education. Hamilton aims to enroll about 40 first-year students in their spring admission program each year. This allows Hamilton to offer admission to additional strong applicants, while also filling spots created by current students who are studying abroad during the spring semester.

Princeton offers a different kind of option for students accepted for fall entry. The Bridge Year Program “allows incoming first-year students to spend a tuition-free year engaging in international service work abroad in Bolivia, China, India, Indonesia or Senegal.” This year, up to 35 incoming freshman are expected to participate.

 Withdrawn Acceptances

This year, there have been several instances of highly selective schools rescinding acceptances due to lower grades or offensive behavior. One widely publicized incident involved 10 students whose Harvard acceptances were revoked after it was discovered that the individuals had participated in the posting of offensive memes to social media.

Withdrawn acceptances are still the exception and not the norm, but students should be aware of the conditions that have caused revoked admissions and how to avoid this situation. For more information, see our blog, Keeping Your College Acceptance.

Tips for Future Applicants

Demonstrate interest. In a competitive admissions climate increasingly concerned with yield, demonstrating interest is more important than ever. Therefore, apply to 10-12 colleges (a manageable number) so that you can visit all of the schools in which you are interested. When you visit, register with the admissions reception desk. Many schools track visits, and see this as the strongest possible way to demonstrate interest.  If you are applying early admissions, visit the college by November 15. If you are applying regular admissions visit in the fall of your senior year, or by February 15 at the latest.

Highlight your heritage. Many universities have made increasing the diversity of incoming classes a top admissions priority. If you identify with an under-represented minority, participate in diversity days hosted by the college, if appropriate.

Think carefully about your college list. When crafting your college list, make sure that you would be happy to attend any school on your list. Do not apply to a university that is not a good fit, or about which you have reservations. Be very realistic about your chances and have grounded expectations. Your college list should have a healthy distribution of reach, target, and safe schools.

Be strategic with early admissions. While early acceptance rates tend to be higher than regular acceptance rates, early admission has become harder to predict. Think carefully and strategically about your early admissions choice.

The college admissions process can be overwhelming, and it may feel difficult to know where to start. At Collegiate Gateway, we are eager to share our expertise and guide you on the path to your “best fit” college. Please feel free to contact us! As always, we’re happy to help!

Early Application Options for US Colleges

All colleges offer high school seniors the option to apply through Regular Decision application plans, in which students typically apply by early January, are notified of admissions decisions by April 1, are not restricted by how many colleges to apply to, and are not bound to attend. Sounds straightforward, right?

But the last few decades have seen a proliferation of numerous “early” admissions options, each with its own rules. For high school students looking ahead to the college admissions process, the variety of early application plans may seem confusing! Should you apply to colleges through Early Decision, Early Action, Single Choice Early Action, or Rolling Admissions plans? Here’s a guide to help you sort through your different options so that you can understand the impact of the different plans and decide which is right for you.

A few relevant terms for early application plans are:

  • Binding: the student is committed to attending the college, if accepted
  • Restrictive: the student may not apply to another admissions program. ED and SCEA are restrictive (applicants can only apply to one such program), while EA, RD, and Rolling plans are not.

EARLY ADMISSIONS PLANS

The two main early admissions plans are Early Decision (ED) and Early Action (EA), including Single Choice Early Action (SCEA). Of the 3500 colleges in the US, about 450 colleges offer one of these early plans. Some colleges, like University of Miami, offer both ED and EA. Typically, early applications are due between Nov 1 – Dec 1, and decisions are given about one month later.

  • Early Decision (ED) applications are binding, so students should reserve this for their first-choice college. Students agree to attend if accepted, so they can only apply to one college through Early Decision. Typically students may simultaneously apply to EA or RD programs, but it’s best to check the colleges’ websites for their policies.
    • Examples: Brown, Northwestern, Rice, Williams
  • Early Action (EA) applications are not binding, so students can typically apply to multiple colleges through Early Action.
    • Examples: CalTech, Georgetown, MIT, Northeastern
  • Single Choice Early Action (SCEA) is a hybrid of Early Decision and Early Action in that students are restricted to one such application, but it is not binding. This plan is sometimes referred to as Restrictive Early Action (REA). Typically, students can apply to public institutions at the same time.
    • Examples: Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Stanford
  • Rolling Admission applications are reviewed as they are received, and students are accepted on a rolling basis until spaces are filled.
    • Examples: Columbia College Chicago, Eckerd College, Kings College London
  • Priority Deadlines are used by many large public institutions to try to identify which of the multitudes of applicants have the strongest interest in attending the school. Such colleges state that applying by the priority deadline (typically in November) will result in a quicker admissions decision, increase the student’s chance of being accepted, and boost the chance of receiving scholarships.
    • Examples: Ohio State University, Penn State University, University of Maryland

FALL DEADLINES FOR REGULAR DECISION

To add to the complications, there are a few college-specific deadlines in the fall that may affect RD applications. It’s critical to read the fine print on colleges’ admissions websites in order to keep informed of colleges’ policies:

  • For the University of California system, applications must be filed from November 1 – November 30 and students are notified of decisions in mid-March. So while the deadline is early in the school year, there is no corresponding Regular Decision process. In contrast, some colleges, such as University of Southern California (USC) offer only Regular Decision with no early application plans.
  • MIT offers both Early Action (November 1 deadline) and Regular Action (January 1 deadline), but has earlier deadlines for scheduling alumni interviews (October 20 and December 10, respectively); and your chances of acceptance are far greater if you interview.
  • The Emory University Scholars Program offers merit scholarships to students who apply by November 15, regardless of whether the application is ED or RD.

The college admissions process is constantly changing. To keep on top of trends and policies, contact Collegiate Gateway! As always, we’re happy to help!
 

 

How to Demonstrate Interest to Colleges

In recent years, “demonstrated interest” has become an increasingly important part of the college admissions process.  Most valued by colleges that are private, smaller, and more selective, this “informed” interest allows you to reveal your knowledge of the college, and make a stronger case as to why the school is a good fit for you.

Demonstrated interest helps colleges assess the likelihood that students will:

  • Attend if admitted
  • Be a good fit and engage in activities on campus
  • Be loyal to the school as an alum, and donate money or time

Citing the 2014 NACAC (National Association of College Admissions Counseling) State of College Admissions Report, Money notes that about 20% of colleges say they place considerable importance on the admissions factor of a student’s demonstrated interest, 34% of colleges claim it’s of moderate importance, and about 20% of colleges state it has no importance at all. About a decade ago, only 7% of colleges assigned heavy importance to demonstrated interest.. One reason for this change is that as the numbers of applicants increases, college admissions has been more selective, and demonstrated interest helps colleges narrow the field. In addition, the US News & World Report college rankings include “yield,” or the percentage of accepted students who choose to attend the college, as one factor, so increasing yield boosts colleges’ rankings.

So how do you go about demonstrating informed interest in a school? Below, we’ve developed a 10-point plan, outlining the many different ways you can communicate the strength and depth of your genuine interest to your best-fit colleges.

Collegiate Gateway’s 10-point plan: 

VISIT the college, and register in the admissions office. Many colleges track campus visits as a key measure of demonstrated interest. The University of Rochester tracks all student contacts with the school. Colleges may offer many different kinds of visit opportunities. For example, many colleges, such as Cornell, Northwestern and University of Michigan, offer tours and information sessions for their specialized schools in fields such as business, engineering, or communications. Some colleges offer organized visit days for students; Lehigh offers a Junior Open House in the spring and Senior Open House in the fall. Other colleges, like Stanford and Brown, do not track visits or interest.

But keep in mind that regardless of whether the college tracks your visit, being on campus still has enormous value for you in helping you understand the features that are a good fit for you, and in determining whether you wish to apply to the school.

ATTEND info sessions at your high school or local college fairs. Even if you have visited the college campus, it is still worthwhile to attend local sessions where your regional admissions officer visits your high school or participates on a panel or college fair in your community.

APPLY EARLY! Applying Early Decision shows the most interest, as the binding decision is a clear demonstration of your commitment to the school. However, only apply ED if you are sure that the college is an excellent fit for you, and is within reach. Applying Early Action (non-binding) also shows interest because you are sufficiently motivated to prepare and submit your application early.

REGISTER on the undergraduate admissions website to receive information.

FOLLOW colleges on social media, including Twitter, blogs, and Facebook. Often, the information posted will be more informal, and will give you a more “inside” look at the school. And some colleges do track your engagement with their social media.

INTERVIEW on-campus or with an alumni in your area. Colleges are reducing the availability of on-campus interviews, due to the increased numbers of students applying and the lack of available staff. Alumni interviews are an excellent option; take advantage of all opportunities.

RESEARCH the college thoroughly when you write your supplemental essays. Many colleges have a “Match Essay” asking why you want to attend the college. Write as specifically as possible about the programs and culture of the college, and about the strengths and interests you would bring to campus.

THANK college officials after college visits and interviews. Email a thank-you note to the admissions officer who conducted your information session or interview, and include specifics regarding what you learned and the features of the college that most appealed to you. In addition, if you interview with an alum in your local area, send a thank-you note including specific discussion topics that were meaningful to you.

CONTACT the regional admissions officer after you apply by sending an occasional email if you have substantive news to report (e.g. honors, awards, completion of a major school project, a special accomplishment in an activity) or a genuine question that is not answered on the website.

CHECK your online portal for your application status, once you’ve applied, as some colleges interpret this as a sign of interest.

As more and more schools rely on demonstrated interest to help them achieve their enrollment goals, it is increasingly important to show your preference for schools in an authentic way. Here at Collegiate Gateway, we are always happy to answer your questions and discuss this topic further. Feel free to contact us!

Majoring in English: How to Find the Best Fit College

The current educational climate is very focused on STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math). College majors that teach specific pre-professional skills toward a set career path are also surging in popularity. But where does that leave the liberal arts majors?

In his book, In Defense of a Liberal Education, journalist and author Fareed Zakaria argues that liberal arts majors teach people how to think, write, and communicate, and that these skills will serve them well throughout the course of an ever-changing career landscape in our current digital economy. According to Zakaria, “The future of a country like the U.S. rests on our ability to master how technology interacts with how humans live, work and play. And that depends on skills fostered by the liberal arts, such as creativity, aesthetic sensibility and social, political and psychological insight.”

By engaging and analyzing texts, and developing reading, writing, and speaking skills, majoring in English will enable you to acquire valuable critical thinking skills, and broaden the scope of your knowledge of the world around you through. Through the study of English you will be able to explore a vast array of subjects during college, and prepare for an extensive range of occupations in the years that follow.

Many English programs are seminar-based, which allows students to work closely with their professors and student peers. Yale University has a descriptive list of what students will take away from majoring in English and reasons for committing to this major. Their final reason is “Because you want to!” Most English majors are passionate about their choice of study and see its inherent value in their lifelong love of learning.

Trends

  • Interdisciplinary Studies

In recent years, English studies have become increasingly interdisciplinary as institutions encourage students to pair the major with other fields of their choice. Many universities have created additional tracks within their English programs to accommodate students to combine English with other disciplines.

At Stanford University, the Interdisciplinary Program within the English major is open to students who wish to combine the study of one literary topic, period, genre, theme or problem with an interdisciplinary program of courses relevant to that inquiry. For example, with a dual major in Psychology and English, an undergraduate can examine a psychological issue or problem through a work of creative non-fiction.

At Boston College, English majors have the opportunity to minor in African and African Diaspora studies, American Studies, Irish Studies, Linguistics, or Women’s and Gender Studies.

  • Double Major

The flexibility of the English major course requirements can also lead to the opportunity to pursue a double major in English and another field. The University of Maryland states, “Double majoring in English is uniquely suited to a number of students, because it combines the broad liberal arts training of English with specific and/or technical training.” English majors do not have to pursue a set sequence of courses and many courses carry cross-disciplinary credits within the liberal arts college.

The benefits of a double major (in which one of the majors is in the liberal arts field) are also supported a 2015 report by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, which found that many companies are looking for employees who are trained in “both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of knowledge” and that this contributes to long-term career success.

Some double majors focus on two liberal arts fields, but it is becoming increasingly popular at universities such as Johns Hopkins, to combine English and the sciences. At the University of Notre Dame, about 39% of business majors carry a second major in the College of Arts & Letters or Sciences. Students should keep in mind that completing a double major requires an increase in workload and careful management of your time.

  • Study Abroad

Majoring in English can also enable you to pursue a study abroad program for a year, semester, or summer. Again, the flexibility in English course requirements and the broad array of English courses offered at institutions in England, Scotland, Australia, and Ireland allow English majors the chance to study elsewhere and gain the rich experience of living abroad.

At Cornell University, English majors are strongly encouraged to take advantage of study abroad programs offered through the Cornell Abroad Program and the College of Arts and Sciences Abroad Program. There are restrictions as to how many English credits can be earned abroad, but with careful planning, students can participate in an array of exciting international programs.

According to the UC-Berkeley Study Abroad program, “English majors find that a term, or better, a year in a foreign university not only enhances their critical and writing skills, but that the experience of adapting to another academic and cultural world expands their self-understanding and gives them a keen sense of the political and social differences in today’s world. The personal and intellectual growth of study abroad provides further advantages when it comes to the challenges of graduate and professional study.”

Common Tracks within the Major

Majoring in English gives undergraduates the opportunity to become specialists on various topics through optional tracks. Many programs have core requirements, but after these courses have been completed, the English major is open to pursue passions in literature or writing through elective courses. This format allows for interdisciplinary study across the gamet of liberal arts fields, as well as, journalism, poetry, and creative writing.

For example, Princeton University offers a multitude of tracks including Literature, Language, and Culture, Arts and Media, Theory and Criticism, and Creative Writing. Students are even able to create their own track of interdisciplinary study by special arrangement with the departmental representative.

The University of North Carolina also offers a fascinating BA in comparative literature, within which students are able to pursue an international literature track, or a global cinemas studies track. Brown University offers a renowned Nonfiction Writing Track, which combines the writing of academic essays with journalism and creative nonfiction.

At NYU, “The department offers a full and varied curriculum in literary history, critical theory, dramatic literature, theatre history, and literary culture, as well as a second major track that allows students to specialize in creative writing.”

The English major is not a “one-size-fits-all” path of study. While there are restrictions and requirements, students have choices and are able to pursue varied interests as they advance in their studies. For many students, this ability to pick and choose from a range of interesting studies is very appealing and rewarding. Regardless, of your class choices, the themes of communication, critical thinking, writing skills, and the ability to make a persuasive argument are threaded throughout all courses.

Research and Internship Opportunities

Research as an undergraduate English major is usually focused on independent, individualized studies aided by the one-on-one mentorship of faculty.

Georgetown University, houses the Folger Undergraduate Program, which offers full access to the Library’s collections as part of an intensive research seminar on books and early modern culture. There, students acquire archival research skills, and pursue advanced independent research on early modern topics.

The University of Rochester has Undergraduate Research Awards that support English majors who need assistance in travel or stay outside of Rochester to pursue the following research opportunities: traveling to scholarly conferences or film festivals, conducting research in archives or libraries, participating in writers’ institutes, and attending intensive language programs abroad. Students must apply for the award and money is granted on a competitive basis.

If you do not wish to do research during your undergraduate experience, there are innumerable internship opportunities, in which you could partake instead. English majors have written pieces for esteemed literary magazines, put their skills into practice at publishing houses, and worked for literary agencies. There are also internships in marketing, advertising, law, politics, journalism, and so many more. Many colleges have a career center that can assist students in finding the right internship fit. Stanford University has a listing of internships that are specifically geared toward English majors.

Careers

Careers commonly associated with English often include teacher, writer, and lawyer. Yet, English has allowed individuals to pursue careers in a wide range of fields.

A study conducted at Brown University illustrates the diversity of career paths that arise from being an English major. With their broad-based English backgrounds, Brown alumni were able to pursue a vast array of occupations in fields including, journalism, publishing, entertainment, public relations, law, and medicine. The University of Michigan also has a website detailing impressive career paths taken by their English major alumni.

How to Evaluate English Programs

When comparing English programs, it is helpful to research the following areas:

  • Student/teacher ratio
  • Seminar class size
  • Core requirements and elective courses
  • Opportunities for interdisciplinary study
  • Minors and concentrations, which can enhance your English major
  • Double major opportunities
  • Research and internship opportunities
  • Study abroad programs
  • Faculty profiles
  • Honors program
  • Independent study

 

For more information, contact us at Collegiate Gateway. As always, we’re happy to help!