Tag Archives: colleges

How to Demonstrate Interest to Colleges

In recent years, “demonstrated interest” has become an increasingly important part of the college admissions process.  Most valued by colleges that are private, smaller, and more selective, this “informed” interest allows you to reveal your knowledge of the college and make a stronger case as to why the school is a good fit for you.

Demonstrated interest helps colleges assess the likelihood that students will:

  • Attend if admitted
  • Be a good fit and engage in activities on campus
  • Be loyal to the school as an alum, and donate money or time

Citing the 2014 NACAC (National Association of College Admissions Counseling) State of College Admissions Report, Money notes that about 20% of colleges say they place considerable importance on the admissions factor of a student’s demonstrated interest, 34% of colleges claim it’s of moderate importance, and about 20% of colleges state it has no importance at all. About a decade ago, only 7% of colleges assigned heavy importance to demonstrated interest.

One reason for this change is that as the numbers of applicants increases, college admissions has been more selective, and demonstrated interest helps colleges narrow the field. In addition, the US News & World Report college rankings include “yield,” or the percentage of accepted students who choose to attend the college, as one factor, so increasing yield boosts colleges’ rankings.

Inside Higher Ed points out that students who have high SAT scores can be impacted by this admissions factor the most. Colleges do not want to be considered a “safety school,” and may avoid high-scoring applicants who demonstrate little interest beyond applying.

So how do you go about demonstrating informed interest in a school? Below, we’ve developed a 10-point plan, outlining the many different ways you can communicate the strength and depth of your genuine interest to your best-fit colleges.

Collegiate Gateway’s 10-point plan: 

VISIT the college and register in the admissions office. Many colleges track campus visits as a key measure of demonstrated interest. The University of Rochester tracks all student contacts with the school. Colleges may offer many different kinds of visit opportunities. For example, many colleges, such as CornellNorthwestern and University of Michigan, offer tours and information sessions for their specialized schools in fields such as business, engineering, or communications. Some colleges offer organized visit days for students; Lehigh offers a Junior Open House in the spring and Senior Open House in the fall. However, there are other colleges, like Stanford and Brown, that do not track visits or interest.

But keep in mind that regardless of whether the college tracks your visit, being on campus still has enormous value for you in helping you understand the features that are a good fit for you, and in determining whether you wish to apply to the school.

ATTEND info sessions at your high school or local college fairs. Even if you have visited the college campus, it is still worthwhile to attend local sessions where your regional admissions officer visits your high school or participates on a panel or college fair in your community.

APPLY EARLY! Applying Early Decision shows the most interest, as the binding decision is a clear demonstration of your commitment to the school. However, only apply ED if you are sure that the college is an excellent fit for you, and is within reach. Applying Early Action (non-binding) also shows interest because you are sufficiently motivated to prepare and submit your application early.

REGISTER on the undergraduate admissions website to receive information.

FOLLOW colleges on social media, including Twitter, blogs, and Facebook. Often, the information posted will be more informal, and will give you a more “inside” look at the school. And some colleges do track your engagement with their social media.

INTERVIEW on-campus or with an alumni in your area. Colleges are reducing the availability of on-campus interviews, due to the increased numbers of students applying and the lack of available staff. Alumni interviews are an excellent option; take advantage of all opportunities.

RESEARCH the college thoroughly when you write your supplemental essays. Many colleges have a “Match Essay” asking why you want to attend the college. Write as specifically as possible about the programs and culture of the college, and about the strengths and interests you would bring to campus.

THANK college officials after college visits and interviews. Email a thank-you note to the admissions officer who conducted your information session or interview, and include specifics regarding what you learned and the features of the college that most appealed to you. In addition, if you interview with an alum in your local area, send a thank-you note including specific discussion topics that were meaningful to you.

CONTACT the regional admissions officer after you apply by sending an occasional email if you have substantive news to report (e.g. honors, awards, completion of a major school project, a special accomplishment in an activity) or a genuine question that is not answered on the website.

CHECK your online portal for your application status, once you’ve applied, as some colleges interpret this as a sign of interest.

As more and more schools rely on demonstrated interest to help them achieve their enrollment goals, it is increasingly important to show your preference for schools in an authentic way. Here at Collegiate Gateway, we are always happy to answer your questions and discuss this topic further. Feel free to contact us!

How to Demonstrate Interest to Colleges

In recent years, “demonstrated interest” has become an increasingly important part of the college admissions process.  Most valued by colleges that are private, smaller, and more selective, this “informed” interest allows you to reveal your knowledge of the college, and make a stronger case as to why the school is a good fit for you.

Demonstrated interest helps colleges assess the likelihood that students will:

  • Attend if admitted
  • Be a good fit and engage in activities on campus
  • Be loyal to the school as an alum, and donate money or time

Citing the 2014 NACAC (National Association of College Admissions Counseling) State of College Admissions Report, Money notes that about 20% of colleges say they place considerable importance on the admissions factor of a student’s demonstrated interest, 34% of colleges claim it’s of moderate importance, and about 20% of colleges state it has no importance at all. About a decade ago, only 7% of colleges assigned heavy importance to demonstrated interest.. One reason for this change is that as the numbers of applicants increases, college admissions has been more selective, and demonstrated interest helps colleges narrow the field. In addition, the US News & World Report college rankings include “yield,” or the percentage of accepted students who choose to attend the college, as one factor, so increasing yield boosts colleges’ rankings.

So how do you go about demonstrating informed interest in a school? Below, we’ve developed a 10-point plan, outlining the many different ways you can communicate the strength and depth of your genuine interest to your best-fit colleges.

Collegiate Gateway’s 10-point plan: 

VISIT the college, and register in the admissions office. Many colleges track campus visits as a key measure of demonstrated interest. The University of Rochester tracks all student contacts with the school. Colleges may offer many different kinds of visit opportunities. For example, many colleges, such as Cornell, Northwestern and University of Michigan, offer tours and information sessions for their specialized schools in fields such as business, engineering, or communications. Some colleges offer organized visit days for students; Lehigh offers a Junior Open House in the spring and Senior Open House in the fall. Other colleges, like Stanford and Brown, do not track visits or interest.

But keep in mind that regardless of whether the college tracks your visit, being on campus still has enormous value for you in helping you understand the features that are a good fit for you, and in determining whether you wish to apply to the school.

ATTEND info sessions at your high school or local college fairs. Even if you have visited the college campus, it is still worthwhile to attend local sessions where your regional admissions officer visits your high school or participates on a panel or college fair in your community.

APPLY EARLY! Applying Early Decision shows the most interest, as the binding decision is a clear demonstration of your commitment to the school. However, only apply ED if you are sure that the college is an excellent fit for you, and is within reach. Applying Early Action (non-binding) also shows interest because you are sufficiently motivated to prepare and submit your application early.

REGISTER on the undergraduate admissions website to receive information.

FOLLOW colleges on social media, including Twitter, blogs, and Facebook. Often, the information posted will be more informal, and will give you a more “inside” look at the school. And some colleges do track your engagement with their social media.

INTERVIEW on-campus or with an alumni in your area. Colleges are reducing the availability of on-campus interviews, due to the increased numbers of students applying and the lack of available staff. Alumni interviews are an excellent option; take advantage of all opportunities.

RESEARCH the college thoroughly when you write your supplemental essays. Many colleges have a “Match Essay” asking why you want to attend the college. Write as specifically as possible about the programs and culture of the college, and about the strengths and interests you would bring to campus.

THANK college officials after college visits and interviews. Email a thank-you note to the admissions officer who conducted your information session or interview, and include specifics regarding what you learned and the features of the college that most appealed to you. In addition, if you interview with an alum in your local area, send a thank-you note including specific discussion topics that were meaningful to you.

CONTACT the regional admissions officer after you apply by sending an occasional email if you have substantive news to report (e.g. honors, awards, completion of a major school project, a special accomplishment in an activity) or a genuine question that is not answered on the website.

CHECK your online portal for your application status, once you’ve applied, as some colleges interpret this as a sign of interest.

As more and more schools rely on demonstrated interest to help them achieve their enrollment goals, it is increasingly important to show your preference for schools in an authentic way. Here at Collegiate Gateway, we are always happy to answer your questions and discuss this topic further. Feel free to contact us!

Why Institutional Accreditation Matters To You: Part II

In our recent blog, Part I: Why Specialized Accreditation Matters to You, we explored a variety of national accreditation boards that provide programmatic accreditation for academic programs in the STEM, arts and business fields. This blog discusses the accreditation of the overall institutions of higher education.

The United States has a unique approach to accreditation of higher education institutions. The vast majority of colleges and universities participate in voluntary, non-governmental accreditation through a peer review process.  Importantly, the agencies are recognized by the U.S. Department of Education “as reliable authorities concerning the quality of education or training offered by the institutions of higher education or higher education programs they accredit.”

Benefits of Institutional Accreditation

There are numerous benefits of institutional accreditation to all the stakeholders:

  • Ensures that the institution’s overall academic program meets specified standards of quality;
  • Qualifies the institution to participate in Title IV federal funding for student financial aid;
  • Assures employers who want to pay for tuition or fees as part of a company-sponsored benefits program;
  • Helps students transfer credits to another institution if appropriate;
  • Strengthens students’ candidacy for graduate school.

The accreditation process itself significantly improves the institution.  Higher education faculty and staff cited the following strengths of participating in the accreditation process: peer-review, self-study, more effective planning and agenda-setting, greater collaboration and dialogue between departments, and reflection about priorities, goals and future needs.

Regional Accreditation Boards

Most institutional accreditations of colleges and universities are conducted at the regional level by the following DOE-approved agencies:

Each agency operates autonomously and sets its own standards. For example, the Middle States Commission, which oversees colleges and universities in New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Delaware, DC, Puerto Rico, and the US Virgin Islands, has seven current standards in the areas of: mission and goals; ethics and integrity; design and delivery of the student learning experience; support of the student experience; educational effectiveness assessment; planning, resources and institutional improvement; and governance, leadership and administration.

Ongoing Institutional Evaluation

Accredited institutions must have comprehensive evaluations at least every ten years to maintain their accredited status – they cannot rest on their laurels!  California College of the Arts was required to have re-accreditation review by WASC (Western Association), the regional accreditation body, from 2007-2009.  According to Melanie Corn, CCA’s Accreditation Liaison Officer, “The process was successful and quite fruitful, inspiring important college-wide conversations.”  Since the prior accreditation, CCA had increased faculty, expanded facilities, and implemented student learning and program assessments.

In addition, new or changed programs require re-accreditation.  New York University has been a member of MSCHE (Middle States Association) since 1921, was last reaffirmed in June 2014, and will have its new locations in Shanghai and Abu Dhabi reviewed for accreditation in June 2019.

Relationship between Regional and Specialized Accreditation

It’s possible to receive both regional institutional accreditation, as well as specialized programmatic accreditation; or to receive one without the other.

Babson College, which provides a business and entrepreneurial education, has both regional NEASC accreditation and specialized AACSB accreditation. SMFA, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, has programmatic accreditation through NASAD (National Association of Schools of Art and Design), but is in the process of receiving regional accreditation by NEASC. Cornell has regional institutional accreditation through MSCHE, and has a variety of specialized accreditations in engineering, business, and architecture, but some programs, such as Industrial and Labor Relations, are not accredited.

Every college is unique. In addition to finding schools that fit your preferences and interests, check whether they are accredited!  For more information, contact us at www.collegiategateway.com.  As always, we’re happy to help!